Planned Giving at Siena Heights University

Dear Alumni & Friends,

The academic year is in full swing and we welcomed our largest freshman class in Siena’s history. We also celebrated the dedication of the new McLaughlin University Center and applauded the great achievements of the 2013 Alumni Award winners at Homecoming. Indeed these are good days on our beautiful campus.

Often times, alumni and friends comment: “I wish I could do more.” This is the reason I write today. If you’ve ever had similar thoughts, I ask you to consider a gift through an IRA Charitable Rollover. As part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, the IRA Charitable Rollover has been extended until December 31, 2013. This provision allows for traditional IRA owners, those 70½ years old and above, to give up to $100,000 from their accounts directly to charitable organizations. With your IRA Charitable Rollover you can make a significant difference in the lives of students, whether by providing sustaining support, creating an endowed scholarship, or by assisting with the many building or renovation projects on campus.

Many donors find that making a gift through an IRA Charitable Rollover is a great way to use IRA assets during their lifetime to make charitable gifts. To complete an IRA Charitable Rollover, the first step is to contact your IRA provider to learn their procedures. The link below contains a sample letter that you can send to your IRA provider to initiate a rollover.

Thank you for your consideration, we appreciate all that you do for Siena. If you have questions or would like more information please call me personally at 517-264-7159.

IRA Transfer Form

Siena Heights University
1247 E. Siena Heights Drive
Adrian, MI 49221
(800) 693-0506
www.sienaheights.edu
  Mitchell P. Blonde ’04, CFRE
Vice President of Institutional Advancement
mblonde@sienaheights.edu

 


The materials contained on this website are intended only to show some ways by which you can make a charitable gift or bequest and thereby minimize federal tax liabilities, as authorized by the Internal Revenue Code. All examples are of a general nature only and should not be applied to your specific situation without first consulting your attorney or other advisers.